Our Blog

Thanksgiving in North America

November 25th, 2020

Thanksgiving marks the start to the holidays; a season filled with feasting, indulging, and spending time with family and friends are always special. Thanksgiving is a holiday meant for giving thanks, and while this may seem like such a natural celebration, the United States is only one of a handful of countries to officially celebrate with a holiday.

Unlike many holidays, Thanksgiving is a secular holiday, and it is celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November in the United States. In Canada, it is celebrated on the second Monday of October, which is, oddly enough, much closer to a time when harvests were likely gathered. In addition to the different dates, the origins of the celebration also share different roots.

Thanksgiving in the United States

Giving thanks for a bountiful harvest are not new, but the modern day holiday in the US can be traced to a celebration at Plymouth in Massachusetts in 1621. This feast of thanksgiving was inspired by a good harvest, and the tradition was simply continued on. At first, the colony at Plymouth didn't have enough food to feed everyone present, but the Native Americans helped by providing seeds and teaching them how to fish, and they soon began to be able to hold a feast worthy of the name. The tradition spread, and by the 1660s, most of New England was hosting a Thanksgiving feast in honor of the harvest.

Canadian Thanksgiving

An explorer of early Canada named Martin Frobisher is accredited for the first Canadian Thanksgiving. He survived the arduous journey from England through harsh weather conditions and rough terrain, and after his last voyage from Europe to present-day Nunavut, he held a formal ceremony to give thanks for his survival and good fortune. As time passed and more settlers arrived, a feast was added to what quickly became a yearly tradition. Another explorer, Samuel de Champlain, is linked to the first actual Thanksgiving celebration in honor of a successful harvest; settlers who arrived with him in New France celebrated the harvest with a bountiful feast.

A Modern Thanksgiving

Today, Thanksgiving is traditionally celebrated with the best of Americana. From feasts and football games to getting ready for the start of the Christmas shopping season, Thanksgiving means roasted turkey, pumpkin pie, and green bean casserole. No matter how you celebrate this momentous day, pause for a moment to give thanks for your friends, family, and all the bounties you’ve received. Happy Thanksgiving from East Madison Dental!

CEREC® Crowns vs. Traditional Crowns

November 18th, 2020

There are different situations for which Drs. Jain, Sabat, Kim, Sohal, Vafiadis, Faldu, Braidy, Park, Chen may recommend a crown, and Drs. Jain, Sabat, Kim, Sohal, Vafiadis, Faldu, Braidy, Park, Chen will recommend different types of crowns depending on your unique situation. Dental crowns are made from various materials, including all-metal, porcelain-fused-to-metal, all-ceramic or porcelain, or resin. The material the crown is made of will dictate the length of time you may have to wait for it, whether or not you will need a temporary, and of course, the cost.

A crown is a protective cap. Possible reasons Drs. Jain, Sabat, Kim, Sohal, Vafiadis, Faldu, Braidy, Park, Chen may want to give you a crown include:

  • To cover a tooth after a root canal
  • To cover a cracked or broken tooth
  • To cover a weak tooth, either because of a large filling, or because of the likelihood that it will crack or break
  • To cover an implant
  • To cover anchor teeth that support a bridge

CEREC crowns

CEREC crowns are made of a solid block of ceramic or resin materials. This type of crown is made right in our office during a single visit. There is no need to construct a temporary crown, take impressions for the permanent crown, and wait for the crown to be made at an off-site dental laboratory to be returned to East Madison Dental about a month later.

This type of crown uses computer technology to take a picture of the tooth that will receive the crown, as well as the surrounding teeth. Thanks to CAD software that works with this system, Drs. Jain, Sabat, Kim, Sohal, Vafiadis, Faldu, Braidy, Park, Chen can design the tooth while looking in your mouth, and make sure the color matches the rest of your teeth. Also, because the crown is made from a single block of material, it is considerably stronger than many other types of crowns.

Types of traditional crowns

All metal: All-metal crowns don’t require as much tooth preparation, and therefore don’t alter the existing tooth structure as much as porcelain-fused-to-metal or ceramic crowns. They are the longest-lasting type of traditional or permanent crown, and are far less likely to break or chip. Metals used may include gold alloy, palladium, nickel, or chromium.

Porcelain fused to metal: Porcelain can be matched to your natural tooth color. A disadvantage, however, is that these types of crowns create more stress and wear on the surrounding teeth than either pure metal or resin. The metal sometimes shows through at the bottom of the tooth, near the gum line. Porcelain can chip or break, but can be made to look exactly like your real teeth.

All ceramic/all porcelain: This type of crown is most easily matched to your existing teeth. Because there is no metal, there is no risk that it will show. This type of crown is ideally suited to people who have metal allergies. The greatest disadvantage is that ceramic or porcelain may cause more wear and tear to the surrounding teeth. On the other hand, it is ideal for front teeth because they look very much like real teeth.

Resin: Resin crowns are cheaper than ceramic, porcelain, or metal crowns. This material is more prone to fracturing and causes more wear and tear on the crown itself.

Different situations warrant different types of crowns. Drs. Jain, Sabat, Kim, Sohal, Vafiadis, Faldu, Braidy, Park, Chen will discuss your situation and determine which type of crown you need. Our team at East Madison Dental is happy to answer any questions you may have about crowns, CEREC, or any other aspect of your oral health.

To learn more about CEREC, or to schedule an appointment with Drs. Jain, Sabat, Kim, Sohal, Vafiadis, Faldu, Braidy, Park, Chen, please give us a call at our convenient Tenafly or Dumont, NJ office!

What stinks?

November 11th, 2020

Spilling soda on someone’s white shirt, telling an off-color joke at an inappropriate time, or sneezing chewed food all over the dinner table all pale in comparison to the socially unacceptable, embarrassing blunder of having ... bad breath!

Five Possible Causes of Halitosis

  • Poor oral hygiene practices. Failing to brush your teeth encourages anaerobic bacteria growth, which involves a type of bacteria that emits volatile sulfur compounds (gases) responsible for smelly breath.
  • If you have tonsils, you may have tonsil stones embedded in the fissures of your tonsils. Tonsil stones are hard, tiny pieces of bacteria, dead oral tissue, and mucus that form inside tonsil crevices. When accidentally chewed, they release extremely foul odors that others can smell and you can actually taste.
  • You have a chronically dry mouth due to medications, allergies, or persistent sinus conditions that force you to breathe through your mouth. Anaerobic bacteria thrive in dry, stagnant environments where oxygen content is minimal. Consequently, a dry mouth tends to lead to smelly breath.
  • You have acid indigestion or GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). If you constantly belch stomach gases, this not only causes your breath to smell fetid but it can lead to enamel erosion and tooth decay.
  • You have one or more oral diseases: gingivitis, periodontitis, or infections in the gums known as abscesses.

Improving oral hygiene practices may eliminate bad breath, but if brushing, flossing, and rinsing with a fluoride mouthwash twice a day doesn’t stop people from backing away from you when you open your mouth, it’s time to visit East Madison Dental.

November Marks National Diabetes Awareness Month

November 4th, 2020

Diabetes is a chronic disease that increases the risk for many serious health problems, including severe gum disease. November is Diabetes Awareness Month, and it’s a great time for us at East Madison Dental to remind our patients that the way you care for your teeth at home doesn’t just affect your oral health; keeping your mouth healthy is vital to your overall health, too.

Diabetes is the result of a deficiency, or lack of the hormone insulin to properly transport glucose (blood sugar) to the cells throughout the body. According to the American Diabetes Association, the most common types of diabetes are Type One (90-95 percent of cases), Type Two (five percent), and gestational or pregnancy diabetes. Women who have had gestational diabetes have a 35 to 60 percent chance of developing diabetes, mostly Type Two, in the ten to 20 years following their pregnancy.

In the past decade, researchers have found links between periodontal (gum) disease and diabetes. Not only are people with diabetes more vulnerable to gum disease, but diabetes may also have the potential to affect blood glucose control, as well as contribute to the advancement of diabetes.

Nearly 26 million Americans currently live with the disease, with an additional 79 million in the pre-diabetes stage. There is some good news we want you to know, however; you can protect your gums and teeth from the effects of diabetes by visiting our Tenafly or Dumont, NJ office for an exam. Patients who are living with diabetes may require more often visits to ensure their dental health remains in tip-top shape. Many insurance plans provide expanded benefits for diabetic patients, and Drs. Jain, Sabat, Kim, Sohal, Vafiadis, Faldu, Braidy, Park, Chen can tell you how often you need to come in for an appointment.

For more information on how we can help, please do not hesitate to give us a call at our Tenafly or Dumont, NJ office.

Your Choice of 2 Convenient Modern Offices